Sanitation and bar setup

Set, teach, and maintain sanitation standards, bar stock, and routines.

Train employees to determine the mixes, garnishes, condiments, and accessories needed, and handle glasses and ice properly.

Set up and close the cash register and train employees to do so.

Coach employees in behind-the-bar
behavior.

 

 

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© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedCHAPTER 9SANITATION AND BAR SETUP© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights Reserved© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedSet, teach, and maintain sanitation standards, bar stock, and routines.Train employees to determine the mixes, garnishes, condiments, and accessories needed, and handle glasses and ice properly.Set up and close the cash register and train employees to do so.Coach employees in behind-the-bar behavior.THIS CHAPTER WILL HELP YOUSANITATIONBacterial HazardsHazard Analysis of Critical Control Points (HACCP) system, a seven-step program designed to find and eliminate potential problem areas for contamination and sanitation, as well as for correct food-storage, cooking, and serving temperatures.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedSANITATIONPreventing the Spread of BacteriaWashing and Handling Glassware and UtensilsFunctional WaterThe development of functional water is for sanitizing and disinfecting.The end product, known as electronically altered water (EAW) or structured water, is created by adding a small amount of salt to water and then electrolyzing it. © 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedFUNCTIONAL WATER The results can be either acidic (low pH) water with the same disinfecting power as if chlorine had been added, or alkaline (high pH) water with extra cleaning power for tough grease and protein stains. An advantage of functional water is its safety in case of accidental ingestion or contact with skin and eyes.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedLIQUOR SUPPLIESEach bar should have a standard brand-by-brand list of liquors, beers, and wines that should be in stock at the bar to begin the workday, with specified quantities of each brand. This is known as par stock.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedMIXESWhatever your choices, the bar must be stocked with sufficient amounts of juices and mixes, chilled and ready to use, at the beginning of every shift. The goal is to increase speed of preparation without sacrificing drink quality.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedWATER SAFETY AND POTABILITYThe most common waterborne parasites include Cryptosporidium and Giardia lamblia, which both cause flu-like symptoms.For commercial use, the micron rating of a water filter is an important consideration. It refers to the size of particles the filter can remove.To remove the parasites mentioned above, NSF International requires a submicron-rated filter that removes at least half-micron-sized (1/50,000 inch) particles.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedBOTTLED WATERGround water is collected from protected underground sources that have not come in contact with animals, people, or the pathogens they might carry. U.S. made bottled water is often surface water, but what is labeled spring water must originate underground and flow naturally to the surface. © 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedBOTTLED WATERBottled water is simply purified drinking water with no special attributes.The term sparkling is used to identify waters to which carbon dioxide (CO2) has been artificially added to create bubbles.The latest category of “enhanced water” beverages is agua fresca, water flavored with fruits.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedCARBONATED MIXESTrend is toward premium sodas, sometimes called microsodas, higher-quality bubbly beverages. Most new brands are simply line extensions—a new flavor or a diet version of an already-popular existing brand.Mocktails are nonalcoholic drink recipes.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedJUICES FOR BAR USERose’s Lime Juice is a syrup made of lime juice and sugar.Sweet-and-sour mixes can also be bought bottled, as frozen concentrate, or in powdered form. Some have a foaming agent, called frothee, that simulates egg white. © 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedOTHER LIQUIDS FOR MIXINGSimple syrup is a mix that you should have in constant supply. This is a labor-saving substitute for sugar in other forms; it blends more quickly than regular or superfine sugar. Orgeat is a sweet, almond-flavored syrup made from barley.Falernum is a slightly alcoholic sweet syrup with an almond-ginger-lime flavor and a milky color. Orange-flower water is a flavoring extract.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedFRUIT GARNISHESTo make lemon or lime twists, use 165 count citrus. A zester or stripper will peel off just the yellow part of the skin. To produce twists without a special tool (see Figure 9.6).If you want lemon or lime wheels for garnishes (see Figure 9.7), simply cut crosswise slices beginning at one end of the fruit. Quartered and impaled on a pick, which is called flagged, with or without a cherry.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedCONDIMENTS FOR FLAVORBar bitters are actually nonbeverage spirits, made by distilling or infusing alcohol formulas of bitter herbs, spices, and other flavoring agents.Bitters are dispensed by the dash, which is the equivalent of ⅙ teaspoon. The dispenser built into the neck of the bottle is called a dasher.Coarse salt is for rimming (applying to the wet rim of) glasses.Superfine sugar, often called bar sugar.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedOPENING THE “BANK”Most bar operations work with a standard amount of starting cash for the cash register, which is called the bank.In some systems, the person closing the bar the night before has left a bank-count slip (see Figure 9.12), which lists the amounts of the various coins and bills.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedMISE EN PLACEThere is a tradition in the restaurant industry that is expressed in the French phrase mise en place, “Everything in its place.” This means that the bar setup “to do” list is complete and everything is in position and ready to go.This also includes closing down the bar and bank.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights ReservedSUMMING UPGood management plays an important role in efficient bar setup: by setting the standards and procedures and requiring that they be observed, by thoroughly training employees in the routines and clearly explaining what is expected, and by frequent follow-up on employee performance.© 2011 John Wiley and Sons, Inc.All Rights Reserved

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